Screening of “Airbag” – November 5th 2014

"Airbag"

Screening on Wednesday, November 5th 2014

*** PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO THE CLOSURE OF LEYTONSTONE LIBRARY FOR REFURBISHMENT, OUR REGULAR VENUE HAS MOVED TO ANOTHER LOCATION. READ BELOW FOR ALL THE DETAILS ***
Airbag
Directed by Juanma Bajo Ulloa
•   Year: 1997
•   Country: Spain
•   Running time: 122 min.
•   Cassification: (N/A)
•   Watch a clip here
One of the most iconic and successful Spanish comedies of all time, 'Airbag' defiantly continues to feature among the very top places on most popular rankings for the best Spanish Comedy film ever, even after nearly two decades of its release.
Summary: Comments:

Juantxo (Karra Elejalde) belongs to the 'high society', he is a university graduate, has a great job and is marrying a gorgeous and rich girl. While celebrating his stag do in a brothel, he loses his expensive wedding ring inside the body of a prostitute and he's forced to try to get it back with the help of his friends Paco (Alberto San Juan) and Konradín (Fernando Guillén Cuervo).

When mafioso brothel owner Villambrosa finds the ring and rival gangster Souza sends a professional killer to square things out, the search for the ring becomes a tumultuous race full of hillarious and bizarre moments along the way.

Airbag is an irreverent, impious and excessive film. Based on an idea from Karra Elejalde, written by Juanma Bajo Ulloa, Karra Elejalde and Fernando Guillén Cuervo, born out of delirium and excess, defined as a moral fable full of immoralities, "Airbag" carries within the germ of controversy and provocation. Basically structured as a road movie, the story grows in a spiral of craziness and surprises.

A special mention is needed for the genius acting of Manuel Manquiña in the role of Pazos, who gives this comedy many hilarious scenes.

Soon after his cinema release, it broke Spanish box office records and to this date it remains a true icon of the Spanish comedy genre.

Screening on November 5th 2014, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm
New venue information:
Leytonstone Children's Centre (former Harrow Green Library building, ground floor)
8 Cathall Road, Leytonstone E11 4LF.
See the location map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Note: If the main entrance in Cathall Rd. is closed then there is a side entrance around the corner in Melon Rd. on the ground floor.
 
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Screening of “Omar” – October 1st 2014

"Omar"

Screening on Wednesday, October 1st 2014

Directed by Hany Abu-Assad
•   Year: 2013
•   Country: Palestine
•   Running time: 96 min.
•   Cassification: (15)
•   Watch a clip here
Winner of the Jury Prize at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, nominee for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2014 Academy Awards and winner of Best Feature Film at the 2013 Asian Pacific Screen Awards.
Summary: Comments:
"Omar is a Palestinian baker who routinely climbs over the separation wall to meet up with his girl Nadja. By night, he's either a freedom fighter or a terrorist — you decide — ready to risk his life to strike at the Israeli military with his childhood friends Tarek and Amjad.
Arrested after the killing of an Israeli soldier and tricked into an admission of guilt by association, he agrees to work as an informant. So begins a dangerous game. Is he playing his Israeli handler  or will he really betray his cause? And who can he trust on either side?." - IMDB.com
"It's complex web of betrayal, love, fear, bravery, and paranoia could be anywhere two sides are facing off in a morally and politically complex situation, especially where one side is a guerrilla uprising, the other an established government.
It could be Ireland and the IRA, or South Africa in the more militant days of the ANC. The beauty and terror of Abu-Assad's film is that it's about people not ideology. And the reality that people on both sides are capable of great good and great evil, often for reasons personal as much as political. "- IMDB.com.
Screening on October 1st 2014, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door, which is located a few metres away on the left of the main gates.

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Screening of “A Month in the Country” – September 3rd 2014

To coincide with the commemoration of the outbreak
of the First World War we are proud to present

"A Month in the Country" 

Screening on Wednesday, September 3rd 2014

Directed by Pat O'Connor
•   Year: 1987
•   Country: UK
•   Running time: 97 min.
•   Cassification: (PG)
•   Watch a clip here
Pat O'Connor directs this tranquil version of the J. L. Carr novel, adapted for the screen by Simon Gray, in which two WWI veterans find themselves neighbours in the summer of 1920 in a small Yorkshire village, where both are involved in excavating the past.
Summary: Comments:

"It is 1919, and war veteran Tom Birkin (Colin Firth) travels to the small English village of Oxgodly to restore a medieval church mural that is hidden under coats of plaster. At the same time, another war veteran, archaeologist John Moon (Kenneth Branagh) is exploring the nearby fields trying to uncover an ancient church grave. 

As they toil away in this placid environment, their emotional war wounds are gradually healed, and they come to terms with their problems. Birkin finds himself falling in love with Alice Keach (Natasha Richardson), the wife of the local vicar, while Moon finds himself learning to deal with his homosexuality." – AllMovie.com

"Initially intended to be a made-for-TV film, the film's producer upgraded his original plan to a cinema feature. Shot during the summer of 1986 and featuring an original score by Howard Blake, the film has been neglected since its 1987 cinema release and it was only in 2004 that an original 35 mm film print was discovered due to the intervention of a fan.

A Month in the Country featured film debuts or early roles of several notable British actors. Although it was the third cinema feature film to cast Colin Firth, it was his first lead role. Similarly, it was Kenneth Branagh's first cinema film, and Natasha Richardson's second. Conversely, it was the last role of David Garth who died in May 1988." – Wikipedia

Screening on September 3rd 2014, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door, which is located a few metres away on the left of the main gates.
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Summer break 2014 and information on next season

Summer break 2014 and information on next season


Hi all,

As it is our custom, we'll be taking a Summer break after our Leytonstone Festival event in July and therefore there will be no film screening in August from us.

We have also some other important news to announce.

Due to the upcoming refurbishment of the Leytonstone Library, unfortunately the whole building will be closed for the next few months and therefore our usual venue, the library hall, will not be available to us or anyone else from September 15th (still a provisional date as of today) and until the refurbishment is complete.

It is for this reason that we are actively looking for alternative venues within the area in which we could do our monthly film screenings.

We're open to ideas and suggestions, but some initial preconditions would be that, ideally, the venue

  • would be free of charge to us for hosting our events (or as close to zero cost as possible, as our other running costs – film screening licenses, etc – are already pretty high for us)
  • would hold a capacity of between 20 to 40+ people – ideally seating.
  • would offer some secure storage space for storing our portable-but-sizeable screening equipment (if this were to become a venue in which we could hold regular events rather than a one-off, this fact would help us a lot too).

In return we could offer some free exposure for the venue in our website and to our ever expanding audiences in our newsletters and social media spaces (subject to review of material provided, etc), which we believe could work very well to cross-promoting our mutual activities and continue supporting our contributions to our local community.

Finally, we're also working on a new programme of films for our next season. We already have a great selection of titles to choose from which suggests this will be another cracker year for us; more of which will be announced here shortly. Also, we should mention again that we're always very keen on having new people around to join us and volunteer to help us running the pop-up cinema on an ongoing and committed way. If this sounds like you, please give us a shout or pop along to any of our screenings.

Thank you all for your understanding, and best regards.

Leytonstone Pop-Up Cinema

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Screening of “How We Used To Live” with Q&A – July 16th 2014

"How we used to live" + Q&A
with film writer Travis Elborough

Screening on Wednesday, July 16th 2014
as part of the Leytonstone Festival events

Directed by Paul Kelly
•   Year: 2013
•   Country: UK
•   Running time: 71 min.
•   Cassification: (U)
•   Watch a clip here
A unique celebration of post-war London by acclaimed director Paul Kelly, created through a compelling use of rare footage drawn from the BFI National Archive and original music by Saint Etienne with a spellbinding narration by Ian McShane.
Summary: Comments:

Using only colour footage from 1950 – 1980 How We Used to Live covers the early days of the welfare state up to the opening years of Margaret Thatcher's reign. From the shadow of the war and the great future created by the welfare state to the rise of individualism and the triumph of the consumer society, it is as much a lyrical cinematic meditation on life now as then.

With a wonderful brand new soundtrack written by Saint Etienne's Pete Wiggs and vocalist Sarah Cracknell providing gorgeous Swingle-y harmonies, the band's Bob Stanley has also collaborated on a inventive script with the writer Travis Elborough (London Bridge in America). This is brought brilliantly to life through the distinctive voice of acclaimed actor Ian McShane (Deadwood, Sexy Beast).

Mixing history with fantasy, the viewer is led through the film by McShane's likeable fictional narrator whose only constant is London. It is a city that he fell hopelessly in love with as child in the provinces and his digressive personal reminisces provide a universal account of the period, its hopes and ambitions and its fears and anxieties.

Alluringly impressionistic, poetical and political, How We Used to Live is perhaps the most joyful, creative and entertaining offering to come from this unique film making collective.

'A waltz through the music of cinematic time' – Sight and Sound Best Films of 2013

Screening on July 16th 2014, Wednesday
Starting time 7:30pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door, which is located a few metres away on the left of the main gates.
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Cancellation of film screening for June

Notice of event cancellation for Wednesday 4th June 2014


It is with great sadness that we have to announce the cancellation of our next regular monthly film screening, scheduled for June 4th 2014.

This is due to urgent repair works on the ceiling being carried out at the Leytonstone library hall at the present time, which is preventing the space to be available to any use, including our screening event.

Our scheduled film was going to be The Salt of Life, a follow up to Mid-August Lunch, a film which we also screened exactly two years ago in June 2012. We hope we'll be able to accommodate and screen The Salt of Life some other time soon at the Pop-up Cinema.

In the meantime, we'll be back in July with a special screening of How We Used To Live, the latest collaboration between the band Saint Etienne and film maker Paul Kelly, which premiered at last year's London Film Festival. You can watch a trailer clip here. This screening will take part as one of the events of the Leytonstone Festival in mid-July, and we'll be publishing full details soon.

Thank you all for your understanding, and best regards.

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Screening of “Kikujiro” – May 7th 2014

"Kikujiro"

Screening on Wednesday, May 7th 2014

Directed by Takeshi Kitano

•   Year: 1999

•   Country: Japan

•   Running time: 116 min.

•   Cassification: (12)

•   Watch a clip here

This is a bittersweet, highly visual road movie and a real treat for fans of maverick actor, writer, director and editor "Beat" Takeshi Kitano (Zatoichi, Sonatine, Hana-Bi, etc). 

The delightful film's soundtrack is composed by the renowned Joe Hisaishi, a regular collaborator on many of Kitano's and Hayao Miyazaki's (of Studio Ghibli) films.

Summary: Comments:

"As summer vacation begins, a boy named Masao sets out on a journey to find his mother, accompanied by an ex-yakuza, a bad mannered and downtrodden man named Kikujiro (played by Kitano). 

After Kikujiro gambles away all the money, the duo gets a ride from other travellers across the country. Along the way they meet a small but colourful cast of characters." – Wikipedia *

"The power this film has lies mostly in its contemplative approach. It's very humorous and isn't really slow, but the camera does take the time to linger on locales, faces, and characters. 

For a few odd parts here and there, it's still really innocent and it seems to show that most people are kind-natured at heart, even when they project an aura of toughness and abusiveness. "- Imdb.com *

Screening on May 7th 2014, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door, which is located a few metres away on the left of the main gates.
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Screening of “The Selfish Giant” – April 2nd 2014

"The Selfish Giant"

Screening on Wednesday, April 2nd 2014

Directed by Clio Barnard
•   Year: 2013
•   Country: UK
•   Running time: 91 min.
•   Cassification: (15)
•   Watch a clip here
Inspired by Oscar Wilde's story of the same name, The Selfish Giant is a contemporary fable about two teenage boys in Bradford who get caught up in the world of copper theft.
Summary: Comments:
"THE SELFISH GIANT is a contemporary fable about 13 year old Arbor (Conner Chapman) and his best friend Swifty (Shaun Thomas). Excluded from school and outsiders in their own neighborhood, the two boys meet Kitten (Sean Gilder), a local scrapdealer – the Selfish Giant.
They begin collecting scrap metal for him using a horse and cart. Swifty has a natural gift with horses while Arbor emulates Kitten – keen to impress him and make some money. However, Kitten favors Swifty, leaving Arbor feeling hurt and excluded, driving a wedge between the boys. Arbor becomes increasingly greedy and exploitative, becoming more like Kitten. Tensions build, leading to a tragic event, which transforms them all." - Rottentomatoes.com
"Inspired by the Victorian fairytale of the same name by Oscar Wilde, the characters of The Selfish Giant are based on people Barnard met while researching The Arbor in and around the Buttershaw Estate in Bradford, including a 14 year old boy called Matty who had been scavenging metal to sell to scrap dealers from the age of 11. By melding together these two contradictory genres, fairytales and social realism, Barnard's aspiration is to tell a contemporary, realist fable.
It was screened in the Directors' Fortnight section at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival where it won the Europa Cinemas award. The film was also nominated for the 2014 Bafta for Best British Film."- Film4 and Wikipedia. *
Screening on April 2nd 2014, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door, which is located a few metres away on the left of the main gates.

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Screening of “Wadjda” – March 5th 2014

"Wadjda"

Screening on Wednesday, March 5th 2014

Directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour

  •   Year: 2012  •  Country: Saudi Arabia, Germany

  •   Running time: 98 min.  •  Classification: (PG)

  •   Watch a clip here

It is one of the first feature films shot entirely in Saudi Arabia and is the first feature-length film made by a female Saudi director. It has won numerous awards at film festivals around the world. *

 

Summary:

"Wadjda is a 10-year-old girl living in a suburb of Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia. Although she lives in a conservative world, Wadjda is fun loving, entrepreneurial and always pushing the boundaries of what she can get away with. After a fight with her friend Abdullah, a neighborhood boy she shouldn't be playing with, Wadjda sees a beautiful green bicycle for sale.

She wants the bicycle desperately so that she can beat Abdullah in a race. But Wadjda's mother won't allow it, fearing repercussions from a society that sees bicycles as dangerous to a girl's virtue. So Wadjda decides to try and raise the money herself. " - IMDB.com

Comments:

"This beguiling German-Saudi co-production turns upon an image that has been a cinematic metaphor for freedom, self-empowerment and lyrical liberation from Buñuel's Un Chien Andalou through Ford's The Quiet Man to Truffaut's Jules et Jim – a man or woman on a bicycle.

The story is an admirable necklace on which to string facts, anecdotes and insights that illuminate in a good-natured way the lives of women in an unthinking, patriarchal, totalitarian society." - The Guardian. *

Screening on February 5th 2014, Wednesday

Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library

Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.

* Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door, which is located a few metres away on the left of the main gates.

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Screening of “Four Lions” – February 5th 2014

"Four Lions"

Screening on Wednesday, February 5th 2014

Directed by Chris Morris

  •   Year: 2010  |  Country: UK

  •   Running time: 97 min. | Cassification: (15)

  •   Watch a clip here

Four Lions premiered at the Sundance film festival in January 2010 and proved both a commercial and critical success on release in the UK. *

 

Summary:

"Four Lions tells the story of a group of British jihadists who push their abstract dreams of glory to the breaking point. As the wheels fly off, and their competing ideologies clash, what emerges is an emotionally engaging (and entirely plausible) farce.

In a storm of razor-sharp verbal jousting and large-scale set pieces, Four Lions is a comic tour de force; it shows that-while terrorism is about ideology-it can also be about idiots." - IMDB.com

Comments:

"In the tradition of Chaplin sending up Hitler, Chris Morris depicts a movement of violent berks and prats. In this film, everyone is stupid. The suicide bombers are stupid; the coppers are stupid; even the clever suicide bomber with the gentle, loving marriage and adoring son is stupid: he is the most culpably stupid of all.

And this never looks like a cop-out or a moral equivalence of stupidity, but the comic enactment of a generally degraded and absurd culture of paranoid futility." - The Guardian. *

Screening on February 5th 2014, Wednesday

Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library

Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.

* Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door, which is located a few metres away on the left of the main gates.

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