Screening of “Bicycle Thieves” – July 6th 2016

"Bicycle Thieves"

Wednesday, July 6th 2016
at Leytonstone Library

4 months, 3 Weeks and Two Days                 
::: Bicycle Thieves :::
  • Directed by: Vittorio De Sica
  • Year: 1948  |  Country: Italy
  • Running time: 94 min.
  • Classification: (U)   |   Watch a clip here
Bicycle Thieves is widely regarded as the most quintessential of Italian neorealism films and a timeless classic. It received an Academy Honorary Award in 1950 and, just four years after its release, was deemed the greatest film of all time by Sight & Sound magazine's poll of filmmakers and critics. Fifty years later the same poll ranked it sixth among greatest-ever films.
Summary:                  Comments:                 
"Antonio (Lamberto Maggiorani) is a poor man who is thrilled when he is at last offered a job: delivering and putting up movie posters. But he needs a bicycle, and must supply his own, so his wife Maria (Lianella Carelli) pawns the family's entire stock of bed linen to redeem the bicycle he had already hocked. On his first day at work, the unlocked machine is stolen and Antonio drops everything to go on a desperate odyssey through the streets of Rome with his little boy Bruno (Enzo Staiola) to get his bike back, pleading and accusing and uncovering scenes of poverty similar to theirs wherever they go.
                      
They create uproar in classic crowd moments: in the streets, in a market, in a church mass. Faces always gather avidly around the pair, all commenting, complaining and generally magnifying the father and son's distress and mortification." The Guardian *
"This landmark Italian neorealist drama became one of the best-known and most widely acclaimed European movies, including a special Academy Award as "most outstanding foreign film" seven years before that Oscar category existed. Written primarily by neorealist pioneer Cesare Zavattini and directed by Vittorio DeSica, also one of the movement's main forces, the movie featured all the hallmarks of the neorealist style: a simple story about the lives of ordinary people, outdoor shooting and lighting, non-actors mixed together with actors, and a focus on social problems in the aftermath of World War II.
                      
As a result, The Bicycle Thief works as a sentimental study of a father and son, a historical document, a social statement, and a record of one of the century's most influential film movements." rottentomatoes.com *
Screening on July 6tht 2016, Wednesday
Starting time 7:00pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Share Button

Screening of “4 months, 3 Weeks and Two Days” – June 1st 2016

"4 months, 3 Weeks
and Two Days"

Wednesday, June 1st 2016
at Leytonstone Library

4 months, 3 Weeks and Two Days
::: 4 months, 3 Weeks and Two Days :::
  • Directed by: Cristian Mungiu
  • Year: 2007  |  Country: Romania, Belgium
  • Running time: 113 min.
  • Classification: (15)   |   Watch a clip here
The film was critically acclaimed and it was also nominated and winner of several awards, including the winner of the Palme d'Or and the FIPRESCI Award at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival.
Summary: Comments:
" The film follows the story of Otilia Mihartescu (Anamaria Marinca) and Gabriela "Gabita" Dragut (Laura Vasiliu), two university friends in an unnamed Romanian town.
 
The film is set in 1987, one of the last years of the Ceaucescu government. When Gabita becomes pregnant, the two girls arrange a meeting with Mr. Bebe (Vlad Ivanov) in a hotel, where he is to perform an illegal abortion (Communist Romania had a natalist policy against abortion)." – Wikipedia *
" The film received an enthusiastic response from critics, earning a 96% rating on Rotten Tomatoes while also earning a 97% rating on Metacritic. Time magazine's Richard and Mary Corliss described it as a "gripping, satisfying film" and Jay Weissberg from Variety magazine said that the film was "pitch perfect and brilliantly acted… a stunning achievement".
 
Several sources view the film as indicative of a broader renaissance in Romanian cinema in the 2000s, in light of other successful Romanian films like Cristi Puiu's The Death of Mr. Lazarescu." – wikipedia *
Screening on June 1st 2016, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door.
Share Button

Screening of “Berberian Sound Studio” – May 4th 2016

"Berberian Sound Studio"

Wednesday, May 4th 2016 at Leytonstone Library

Berberian Sound Studio
::: Berberian Sound Studio :::
  • Directed by: Peter Strickland
  • Year: 2012  |  Country: UK
  • Running time: 92 min.
  • Classification: (15)   |   Watch a clip here
A sound engineer's work for an Italian horror studio becomes a terrifying case of life imitating art.
Summary: Comments:
" British sound engineer Gilderoy (Toby Jones) arrives at the Berberian film studio in Italy to work on what he believes is a film about horses. During a surreal meeting with Francesco, the film's producer, Gilderoy is shocked to find the film is actually an Italian 'giallo' film, The Equestrian Vortex.
 
He nonetheless begins work in the studio, at one point made to do Foley work, using vegetables to create sound effects for the film's increasingly gory torture sequences, and mixing voiceovers from session artists, Silvia and Claudia, into the score.
 
As time passes, and Gilderoy feels more and more disconnected from his mother at home, he begins to fear he's out of his depth. His colleagues seem increasingly rude – to both himself and to each other. The horror sequences grow ever more shocking, yet Santini, the director, refuses to admit they are working on a horror film." – Wikipedia *
" Sound is a sacrament in the Berberian Sound Studio: it enters innocuously through the ears before transubstantiating into something more sinister. That might be the most straightforward way of describing what happens in this thrillingly unstraightforward film from the English director Peter Strickland about the odd goings-on in a fusty Italian post-production suite.
 
This is only Strickland’s second film after his (very fine) 2009 debut, Katalin Varga, and both times I have seen it, its vision, ingenuity and sheer gobsmacking audacity have blown me ten feet out of my seat. It is one of the year’s very best films, a great, rumbling thunderclap of genius." – Telegraph.co.uk *
 
" With a face suggesting cherubic innocence, vulnerability and cruelty, Toby Jones gives the performance of his career, and Peter Strickland has emerged as a key British film-maker of his generation." – theguardian.com *
Screening on May 4th 2016, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door.
Share Button

Screening of “I Am Nasrine” plus Q&A – April 6th 2016

"I Am Nasrine"

plus Q & A session with one of the film's stars, Shiraz Haq

Wednesday, April 6th 2016 at Leytonstone Library

I am Nasrine
::: I Am Nasrine :::
  • Directed by: Tina Gharavi
  • Year: 2012  |  Country: UK
  • Running time: 93 min.
  • Classification: (15)   |   Watch a clip here
British-Iranian drama film written and directed by Tina Gharavi. The film was nominated at the 66th British Academy Film Awards for Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer. The film touches on aspects of racism and treatment of refugees in the UK.

We'll also be doing a Q&A session with special guest Shiraz Haq, who is starring on the film.

Summary: Comments:
"I Am Nasrine follows the paths of Nasrine and Ali, sister and brother in a comfortable, middle-class Iranian home. When Nasrine has a run-in with the police, the punishment is more than she bargained for: their father orders them both to relocate to the UK.
 
Arriving in Britain, their fate and their future are far from certain. As Nasrine finds the courage to accept her fate, she discovers that the end of her journey is really just the beginning" – iamnasrine.com *

"I finally watched I Am Nasrine. It made me cry. It is a film that captures the beauty of human interactions – tentative and curious – and is full of ideas about how to frame and tell a story […] It is profoundly relevant and puts to shame many portrayals of Iranian people." – Mark Cousins, Film Historian & Critic

"We are all much more thoughtful and potentially better people for the insights this film gives – it is for each of us to learn from or ignore the messages, so powerful if we can experience the former." –  
Keith Best, Chief Executive, Freedom from Torture

Screening on April 6th 2016, Wednesday, followed by a special Q&A session with special guest Shiraz Haq, who is starring on the film.
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
** Special Promotion: for all audience members there is a special dinner menu on offer at  the Star of India restaurant for £10 on the night, including a drink
Share Button

Screening of “Holy Motors” – March 2nd 2016

"Holy Motors"

Wednesday, March 2nd 2016 at Leytonstone Library

Holy Motors
::: Holy Motors :::
  • Directed by: Leos Carax
  • Year: 2012  |  Country: France, Germany
  • Running time: 113 min.
  • Classification: (18)   |   Watch a clip here
From dawn to dusk, a few hours in the shadowy life of a mystic man named Monsieur Oscar. The film premiered on 23 May 2012 in competition at the 65th Cannes Film Festival. Variety reported that the screening was met with "whooping and hollering" and "a storm of critical excitement on Twitter"
Summary: Comments:
"From dawn to dusk, a few hours in the life of Monsieur Oscar, a shadowy character who journeys from one life to the next. He is, in turn, captain of industry, assassin, beggar, monster, family man… He seems to be playing roles, plunging headlong into each part – but where are the cameras?
 
Monsieur Oscar is alone, accompanied only by Celine, the slender blonde woman behind the wheel of the vast engine that transports him through and around Paris. He's like a conscientious assassin moving from hit to hit. In pursuit of the beautiful gesture, the mysterious driving force, the women and the ghosts of past lives. But where is his true home, his family, his rest? " – bbfc.co.uk *
Amongst various other accolades, Sight & Sound film magazine placed the film at #4 on its critics poll of the best films of 2012; The Village Voice also ranked the film 3rd on its annual poll of film critics.
 
The film was ranked first by both Film Comment and Indiewire on their year-end film critics polls. Manohla Dargis of The New York Times called Holy Motors one of 2012's 10 best films. French film magazine Cahiers du cinéma elected Holy Motors the best film of the year." – Wikipedia *
Screening on March 2nd 2016, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door.
Share Button

Screening of “Nine Queens” – February 3rd 2016

"Nine Queens"

Wednesday, February 3rd 2016 at Leytonstone Library

Nine Queens
::: Nine Queens :::
  • Directed by: Fabián Bielinsky
  • Year: 2000  |  Country: Argentina
  • Running time: 114 min.
  • Classification: (15)   |   Watch a clip here
The story centers on two con artists who meet and decide to cooperate in a major scam. The film was nominated for 28 awards and won 21 of them, and is now considered a classic in the country's film history.
Summary: Comments:
"Early one morning, Marcos observes Juan successfully pulling off a bill-changing scam on a cashier, and then getting caught as he attempts to pull the same trick on the next shift. Marcos steps in, claiming to be a policeman, and drags Juan out of the store. Once they are back on the street, Marcos reveals himself to be a fellow swindler with a game of much higher stakes in mind, and he invites Juan to be his partner in crime.
 
A once-in-a-lifetime scheme seemingly falls into their laps – an old-time con man enlists them to sell a forged set of extremely valuable rare stamps, The Nine Queens. The tricky negotiations that ensue bring into the picture a cast of suspicious characters, including Marcos' sister Valeria, their younger brother Federico and a slew of thieves, conmen and pickpockets." – imdb.com *
Film critic Roger Ebert liked the screenplay of the film, and wrote, "And on and on, around and around, in an elegant and sly deadpan comedy. A plot, however clever, is only the clockwork; what matters is what kind of time a movie tells. Nine Queens is blessed with a gallery of well-drawn character roles [..]"
 
The San Francisco Chronicle film critic, Edward Guthmann, also reviewed the film positively and thought the actors performed quite well, writing, "Fast-paced and unerringly surprising, Nine Queens is nicely performed by a large cast, particularly Darín (El hijo de la novia) as a goateed, less-than-perfect hoodwinker." – Wikipedia *
Screening on February 3rd 2016, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door.
Share Button

Screening of “Cold Fever” – Dec. 2nd 2015

"Cold Fever"

Wednesday, December 2nd 2015 at Leytonstone Library

Cold Fever
::: Cold Fever :::
  • Directed by: Fridrik Thor Fridriksson
  • Year: 1995  |  Country: Iceland, Japan, Germany, Denmark, USA
  • Running time: 83 min.
  • Classification: (15)   |   Watch a clip here
It is a road movie set in Iceland and was the first of Fridrik's films to be made in the English language. The movie depicts the travels of a Japanese man across Iceland. It was jokingly promoted as the best Icelandic-Japanese road movie of 1995.
Summary: Comments:
"Hirata finds himself canceling his vacation plans to Hawaii when his grandfather reminds him of his duty to his parents. Seven years earlier, Hirata's parents had been killed in an accident in Iceland and Japanese tradition holds that their souls will not be at ease until the proper ceremonies have been performed.
 
Thus, Hirata sets out on a journey, a quest to the river where his parents perished. Along the way, in this Icelandic-Japanese road movie, he encounters many difficulties, tough situations, and odd people in the land of fire and ice." – imdb.com *
"Far from being a random sequence of oddball occurrences, "Cold Fever," under its jokey surface, has a steady allegorical resonance. Mr. Fridriksson, the film's director, is best known in this country for his 1991 movie "Children of Nature," which won an Academy Award nomination for best foreign film.
 
If the mood here isn't so solemn, the symbolism runs in the same direction. With its crazy hitchhikers, tipsy singing cowboys and an itinerant funeral groupie, "Cold Fever" has the superficial charm of a lighthearted American road movie." – The New York Times *
Screening on December 2nd 2015, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door.
Share Button

Screening of “The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser” – Nov. 4th 2015

"The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser"

We are returning back to our usual venue at the Leytonstone Library!

And to celebrate it, we're showing one of Werner Herzog's most celebrated masterpieces on November 4th, Wednesday. Don't miss it!!

The_Enigma_of_Kaspar_Hauser
::: The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser :::
  • Directed by: Werner Herzog
  • Year: 1974   |   Country: Germany   
  • Running time: 110 min.
  • Classification: (PG)   |   Watch a clip here
Based on the true story of a man who appeared in Nuremberg in 1828, hardly able to communicate and carrying a bizarre note. It was only after an attempt was made to integrate him into society that he was able to explain the terrible truth about his past. The film was nominated for the Palme d'Or at the 1975 Cannes Film Festival, winning three awards.
Summary: Comments:
When Kaspar Hauser (Bruno S.), a young German man, is suddenly released from an existence of inexplicable confinement, he is forced into regular society.
 
Barely capable of communicating, Hauser is exploited in a circus sideshow until he is taken under the wing of the kindhearted Professor Daumer (Walter Ladengast), who slowly helps him acclimate to conventional life, even teaching him to read and write. Despite his best efforts, however, Hauser may not be able to escape the horrors of his past.
"Remarkably played by Bruno S, a former mental-hospital inmate, Herzog's Kaspar Hauser is arguably a figure to compare with, say, Greystoke or The Elephant Man: a test case for finding nobility and perfectibility in any human being, or more importantly in the human society in which he finds himself.
 
But perhaps now in the era of the Fritzl case – and its various fictional treatments – our attention turns to the mystery of young Kaspar's incarceration, and the question is more about an essential humanity that can survive mistreatment. Either way, it is an unmissable film."– The Guardian *
Screening on November 4th 2015, Wednesday
Starting time 7:45pm at Leytonstone Library
Church Lane, E11 1HG, London. See map
Entrance £5 (£4 all concessions)
Check disabled access options availabe here.
Note: If the main gates are closed (usually after 8pm) then entrance to the library will be through the disabled access door.
Share Button

Film screenings notice

Film screenings notice – Sept. 2015


This notice is to announce the temporarty cancellation of our regular monthly film screenings, starting from September 2nd 2015.

Unfortunately, we need to stop our regular screenings at the Leytonstone Children Centre in Cathall Road.

We are trying to relocate to our former location at the Leytonstone library now that it has reopen after their refurbishment works, but until then, we won't be able to continue to run any more film nights.

As soon as we know more about our venue relocation, we'll update this site. So keep an eye on this for further news hopefully very soon.

Thank you all for your understanding, and best regards.

Leytonstone Pop-Up Cinema

Share Button

‘Free Film Day’ event at Leytonstone Festival 2015

"FREE FILM DAY" EVENT

Three FREE Screenings on Saturday 11th July
as part of the Leytonstone Festival 2015 events

*** NOTICE: THE PLANNED SCREENING OF 'MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO' HAS BEEN CANCELLED – REPLACEMENT FILM SOON TBC ***

Due to Studio Canal's active refusal to allow the DVD screening of Totoro, we are sorry to announce the cancellation of this film's screening, and a replacement film will soon be announced and screened instead on the same slot. We are sorry for the inconvenience caused


 

::: THE ANARCHIST RABBI  +  DIRECTOR Q&A :::
  • Directed by: Adam Kossoff
  • Year: 2014   |   Country: UK   |   Running time: 45 min.
  • Classification: (N/A)
Starting Time: 5.30pm
Directed by established Leytonstone film-maker Adam Kossoff and narrated by Steven Berkoff. The Anarchist Rabbi is about Rudolf Rocker and the forgotten history of Yiddish East End anarchism at the turn of the last century. An essayistic film, it explores the politics of urban space and how urban development destroys collective memory.
The Anarchist Rabbi

 

 

 

Swandown
::: SWANDOWN :::
  • Directed by: Andrew Kötting
  • Year: 2012   |   Country: UK   |   Running time: 98 min.
  • Classification: (U)   |   Watch a clip here
Starting Time: 7.30pm
Swandown is a travelogue and odyssey of Olympian ambition; a poetic film-diary in which Andrew Kötting and Iain Sinclair pedal a swan-shaped pedalo from the seaside in Hastings to Hackney in London, via the English inland waterways.

** SCREENINGS ARE ON JULY 11TH 2015, SATURDAY ** 

Venue information:

Leytonstone Children's Centre
(Former Harrow Green Library, ground floor)
8 Cathall Road, E11 4LF – Leytonstone

See the location map

THIS IS A FREE EVENT – There will be limited seats and these will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

* Please note, if the main entrance in Cathall Rd. is closed then there is a side entrance to the building around the corner in Melon Rd.

 

 

Share Button